YOGA STYLES: Modern

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Yoga for Postpartum Back Pain

By Michael Gleason Can Yoga help women suffering with postpartum back pain? The literal meaning of yoga is to join or to yoke. And after a life-changing event, such as giving birth, resuming your yoga practice is very important in order for a mother to feel whole again – especially in the singular sense. During [...]

Yoga For Postpartum Depression

By Michael Gleason Can Yoga relieve postpartum depression? Entering motherhood can be an exciting time: buying baby clothes, either turning a spare bedroom or making space in the home for a nursery, and choosing a name. And then the woman goes to the hospital around the baby’s due date and comes home as a mother [...]

Chair Yoga Promotes Student Safety: Inclusion

There are many different populations of students who can benefit enormously from a practice of Chair Yoga. Some of the specialized groups of students who benefit from a supported practice include older students, students who are recovering from head injuries, students who are healing from surgical procedures, and students who may be living with long-term, chronic diseases that affect their balance, coordination and their ability to stand for extended periods of time.

What Should Yoga Teachers Know About Accepting Pregnant Students?

For some people, lying on the back is not going to be comfortable. For pregnant women, you should avoid having them on their backs altogether. Some women find it to be welcome relief to learn modified postures instead of lying in Shavasana. Yoga can be a great way to keep the body healthy during pregnancy, but it is important that your students never push themselves too far with their poses.

Are You Qualified to Accept Pregnant Yoga Students?

As a newly minted prenatal yoga teacher who is eminently qualified to teach pregnant students, you'll want to stay away from particular techniques. Poses that require women to rigorously twist their abdomens from side to side can ultimately compress this region of the body. During the first trimester, women should likewise avoid jumping in and out of asanas, headstands, handstands and other poses that require them to hold their bodies in a delicately balanced position for several seconds. As an instructor, you should also advise women to avoid abdominal work. Since the stomach area is designed to expand during pregnancy, women can forget about the “no gain, no pain” methods for training their abs until after the baby has been born. Compressing the fetus is just not in your baby’s best interest.