Teaching Yoga: Choosing Yoga Techniques for a Lesson Plan

January 1st, 2012

yoga certificationBy Narendra Maheshri

Teaching Yoga requires a certain level of commitment, both to yourself and the students who are learning from you. Just as life is always evolving, so is your practice. Choosing techniques for a lesson plan is going to depend on a number of factors. Some of those factors will include the types of classes you will be teaching. After all, a class you would teach for school age children would probably require a different lesson plan than a class you would be leading for people who are senior citizens. A beginners Yoga class will differ from a more advanced class.

Of course, many classes are advertised as “open to anyone, regardless of age or Yoga experience.” It is useful to have a specific set of poses in mind along with how to teach people variations on what you are doing. This can help keep beginners comfortable and focused and can also help keep more experienced students engaged in the class. Yoga lesson plans certainly do not have to be rigid or set in stone. Instead, they should act as a guide that can help you to stay on track and help your students as they are learning.

Lesson plans are going to vary greatly according to what style of Yoga you are teaching. Hatha or Ashtanga Yoga plans are going to be focused more on the gentle flow of poses and some meditation, along with some chanting. After all, this form of Yoga is for people who are looking to relax. Power Yoga classes will be altogether different. This form of Yoga is very physically demanding, with meditation kept to a minimum. The lesson plan for Power Yoga will certainly be more physically challenging than other types of Yoga.

When you are teaching a class keep in mind that you are also learning from your students. The ebb and flow of teacher and student is a constant presence within the class. That’s why it is good to be able to lean upon a lesson plan but to be flexible enough to change it as needed. Poses that seem challenging to one Yoga class might be the perfect option for another class and often that can’t be determined until you are in the depths of teaching. As your practice and experience grows, so will your ability to gauge which lesson plans offer the most for yourself and your students.

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One Response to “Teaching Yoga: Choosing Yoga Techniques for a Lesson Plan”

  1. jo brennan says:

    I love the part that says you will learn from your students–so many different body types can teach you multitudes if you take the time to study them….

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